Monthly Archives: December 2017

Thinking About NVCC 12/31/2017

The landscape of the Christmas Season is one of miss-directions, for the Christmas season takes us down many paths. One path we may be pulled down is the remembering of Jesus and His birth, and that is a good thing. There are other paths that are not so good. For instance the season may cause us to dwell on our current troubles, losses, or past experiences that we would just as soon take a breather from rather than reminisce about, but the season causes those memories to keep popping up in all their rawness. The season may also pull us toward certain temptations, or habits that we are weak in, and therefore, Christmas becomes a time of extra diligence on our part to avoid temptations.

In a season that can cause miss-direction let us open our Bibles and see the true reason for the season:

1. 1John 3:5, “He appeared so that he might take away our sins.”
2. 1John 3:8, “The reason the son of God appeared was to destroy the devil’s work.”
3. John 14:9 [Jesus said] “Anyone who has seen me has seen the Father.” From this verse we might say, “Jesus came to reveal God to us.”
4. Heb 9:28, “He [Jesus] will appear a second time not to bear sin, but to bring salvation to those who are waiting for him.” From this verse we can say, “Jesus came so that he can come back again.”

Remember the reason,

Kirby

 

http://www.nvccphx.com

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Thinking About NVCC 12/24/2017

In preparing for our sermon this week, I was led to this passage, “Be dressed ready for service and keep your lamps burning. Like men waiting for their master to return from a wedding banquet, so that when he comes and knocks they can immediately open the door for him,” (Luke 12:35-36). I wondered what the phrase in the verse means, “Men waiting for their master to return?”

One of the perils of our modern world is we are so occupied with the immediate that we fail to lift our eyes and look toward the ultimate; Jesus’ return. This pre-occupation with the immediate means we have lost the vision of God, and His final victory. A characteristic of a life based on the immediate means a life that is always being disturbed; a life that is always seeking more.

The Christian life is never disturbed, because the Christian is always watching and waiting, and therefore, ready for Christ to disturb us. The Christian understands that God is leading, guiding, preparing, honing, and purifying them, so that at any moment He can change the direction of our life with a new command.

Jesus never lost sight of His ultimate work; the establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth, and that is because He never took His eyes of the Father. What then is the ultimate work for the Christian? It is to be dressed ready for service, with our lamps burning. We are waiting for Jesus return, and when He knocks we are not disturbed.

Watching and Waiting,

Kirby

http://www.nvccphx.com

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Thinking About NVCC 12/17/2017

The Bible teaches that Jesus is going to return, and when He returns it will be sudden, and without warning. About Jesus return the Bible says, “Be on the alert, for you do not know which day your Lord is coming,” (Matt. 24:42). The Bible also teaches us that when the world around us is saying “Peace and Safety! Then destruction will come upon them suddenly,” (1Thess 5:3).

These verses teach us that waiting for Jesus return is not laziness, going to sleep, or abandonment of effort. Waiting for Jesus means remaining active, for “God works for him that waits in Him,” (Isa. 61:4). The Hebrew word wait is closely related to another Hebrew word that means, “To entrench.” We do no damage to the Isaiah verse by saying, “God works for him that entrenches himself in Him.” The idea of waiting for God is that of digging ourselves in to God.

Waiting for God means that I put my life into right relationship with God through the one I am absolutely and everlastingly certain of who can do that; His Son Jesus Christ. Waiting for God means that I adjust my life to the teachings of Jesus Christ, rather than to the circumstances in my life, and set my hope on His promises rather than on the intelligence, and cleverness of men. Waiting for God means that my personal activity is occupied with adjusting to the facts and circumstances of my life to the unchangeable, consistent, constant fact of God.

Entrench in God,

Kirby

http://www.nvccphx.com

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Thinking About NVCC 12/10/2017

In preparing for our sermon this week, I was led to this passage, “Be dressed ready for service and keep your lamps burning. Like men waiting for their master to return from a wedding banquet, so that when he comes and knocks they can immediately open the door for him,” (Luke 12:35-36). I wondered what the phrase in the verse means, “Men waiting for their master to return?”

One of the perils of our modern world is we are so occupied with the immediate that we fail to lift our eyes and look toward the ultimate; Jesus’ return. This pre-occupation with the immediate means we have lost the vision of God, and His final victory. A characteristic of a life based on the immediate means a life that is always being disturbed; a life that is always seeking more.

The Christian life is never disturbed, because the Christian is always watching and waiting, and therefore, ready for Christ to disturb us. The Christian understands that God is leading, guiding, preparing, honing, and purifying them, so that at any moment He can change the direction of our life with a new command.

Jesus never lost sight of His ultimate work; the establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth, and that is because He never took His eyes of the Father. What then is the ultimate work for the Christian? It is to be dressed ready for service, with our lamps burning. We are waiting for Jesus return, and when He knocks we are not disturbed.

Watching and Waiting,

Kirby

http://www.nvccphx.com

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Thinking About NVCC 12/3/2016

“He put a new song in my mouth, a hymn of praise to our God,” (Ps. 40:3).

Music is important to us, and perhaps that is why, when it comes to church music, everyone has an opinion about what the correct music is to play in church. These opinions have led to many arguments within the church. It is obvious there is such a thing as Christian music, but the Bible is silent on what music is good or bad church music.

We all come from different parts of the country, and came of age in different eras. Therefore, some of us like Country, Dixie-Land, Blues, Polka, Rock and Roll, Classical, and Bluegrass. Thus only an elitist would say one style is better than the other.

The controversy over music is not new. The music for Martin Luther’s, A Mighty Fortress is our God, was borrowed from a popular 16th century song. Charles Wesley used tunes from taverns for some of his hymns. John Calvin used secular song writers of his day. The Queen of England referred to them as, “Calvin’s jigs.” When Silent Night was first published it was called “Vulgar mischief and void of all religious feelings.” Handel’s Messiah was condemned as “Vulgar Theater.”

Today we are taking a break from our normal service to sing some of the old hymns. These hymns were not composed in a vacuum, but came from a story that was behind the song. Thus we conclude that what really makes a hymn sacred is not the style, but the message it brings.

Music,

Kirby

http://www.nvccphx.com

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